dismiss


dismiss
dismiss 1 Dismiss, discharge, cashier, drop, sack, fire, bounce are comparable when they mean to let go from one's employ or service.
Dismiss basically denotes a giving permission to go
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he dismissed the assembly— Acts 19:41

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dismissed the night-watchers from the room, and remained with her alone— Meredith

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When used in respect to employment it carries apart from the context no suggestion of the reason for the act and is, therefore, often preferred as the softer or as the more comprehensive term
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with the letup in business, thousands of employees were dismissed

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the new governor dismissed the staff that served his predecessor and appointed members of his own party in their places

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Discharge is usually a harsher term, implying dismissal for cause and little or no likelihood of being called back
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discharge an employee for insubordination

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she has the habit of discharging her servants without notice

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a rich man can discharge anyone in his employment who displeases him— Shaw

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Only in military and court use does it, when unqualified, carry no implication of dissatisfaction on the part of the employer
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the enlisted man will be discharged after three years' service

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the three convicted soldiers were dishonorably discharged

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the judge discharged the jury with thanks

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Cashier implies a summary or ignominious discharge from a position of trust or from a position that is high in the scale
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cashier a suspected official

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many a duteous and knee-crooking knave . . . wears out his time, much like his master's ass, for nought but provender, and when he's old, cashieredShak.

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the few sentimental fanatics who . . . proceeded upon the assumption that academic freedom was yet inviolable, and so got themselves cashieredMencken

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Drop, sack, fire, and bounce are all rather informal.
Drop is a common and colorless synonym of dismiss
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many employees were dropped when business slackened

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Sack stresses a being discarded or thrown out of employ
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he was sacked after long years of service

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Blum had sacked him because he wore blue undershirts— Bennett

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while fire stresses a dismissal as sudden and peremptory as the action of firing a gun
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he fired his clerk one day in a fit of anger, but the next day he called him back

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and bounce, a kicking out
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he bounced the boy after one day of unsatisfactory service

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2 *eject, oust, expel, evict
Analogous words: *discard, cast, shed, slough: spurn, repudiate, reject, refuse (see DECLINE vb): scorn, scout (see DESPISE)
Contrasted words: accept, *receive, admit: entertain, *harbor

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dismiss — dis·miss vt 1: to remove from position or service dismiss ed the employee 2: to bring about or order the dismissal of (an action) the suit was dismiss ed vi: to bring about or order a dismissal the pla …   Law dictionary

  • dismiss — dis‧miss [dɪsˈmɪs] verb [transitive] 1. HUMAN RESOURCES to remove someone from their job, usually because they have done something wrong: • He was dismissed from his job at a bank for repeatedly turning up to work late. 2. LAW to state officially …   Financial and business terms

  • Dismiss — Dis*miss , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismissed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dismissing}.] [L. dis + missus, p. p. of mittere to send: cf. dimittere, OF. desmetre, F. d[ e]mettre. See {Demise}, and cf. {Dimit}.] 1. To send away; to give leave of departure; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dismiss — [v1] send away, remove; free abolish, banish, boot*, brush off*, bundle, cast off*, cast out*, chase, chuck, clear, decline, deport, detach, disband, discard, dispatch, dispense with, disperse, dispose of, dissolve, divorce, do without, drive out …   New thesaurus

  • dismiss — [dis mis′] vt. [ME dismissen < ML dismissus, pp. of dismittere, for L dimittere, to send away < dis , from + mittere, to send: see MISSION] 1. to send away; cause or allow to leave 2. to remove or discharge from a duty, office, position, or …   English World dictionary

  • Dismiss — Dis*miss , n. Dismission. [Obs.] Sir T. Herbert. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dismiss — early 15c., from L. dimissus, pp. of dimittere send away, send different ways; break up, discharge; renounce, abandon, from dis apart, away (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + mittere send, let go (see MISSION (Cf. mission)). Prefix altered by analogy with… …   Etymology dictionary

  • dismiss — ► VERB 1) order or allow to leave; send away. 2) discharge from employment. 3) regard as unworthy of consideration. 4) Law refuse further hearing to (a case). 5) Cricket end the innings of (a batsman or side). DERIVATIVES dismissal noun …   English terms dictionary

  • dismiss — v. 1) to dismiss curtly, summarily; lightly 2) (D; tr.) to dismiss as (he was dismissed as incompetent) 3) (D; tr.) to dismiss for (I was dismissed for being late) 4) (D; tr.) to dismiss from (he was dismissed from his job) 5) (misc.) (BE;… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • dismiss */*/ — UK [dɪsˈmɪs] / US verb [transitive] Word forms dismiss : present tense I/you/we/they dismiss he/she/it dismisses present participle dismissing past tense dismissed past participle dismissed 1) to refuse to accept that something might be true or… …   English dictionary


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